• Likability Factor

    by AlphaWolf & Co.
    2 comments

    Quick Definition: The title of a book by Tim Sanders that presents the idea that people who are well liked are more apt to get what they want out of life than those who are disliked.


    Full Definition:

    A social artist’s degree of likability often determines his success with women and in life. While there are “asshole game” advocates, even the bad guys are likable in a way—the villain that others can relate to, or even sympathize with. The best villains are often the ones that are a little crazy but understandable from the audience’s perspective.

    According to a reviewer:

    The choices you make don’t shape your life as much as the choices other people make about you.

    People make choices using the following three steps:
    1) Listen – people can chose to listen to you
    2) Believe – people can chose to believe you
    3) Value – people can chose to value what you offer

    Likability affects all three.

    There are four elements of likability:

    1) Friendliness. Friendliness is the threshold of likeability
    2) Relevance, how you connect with another person’s wants or needs
    3) Empathy (not sympathy)
    4) Realness or authenticity. Lack of realness, like lying, hypocrisy, or insincerity can suck your L-factor down.

    Tim Sanders talks about likability factor at work and how it can help you:


    Usage:

    You need to increase your likability factor to reduce the AMOG’ing that’s taking place every night!


    Related Terms: AA, Attraction, MM, Hook Point, IOI, Qualification, Reverse Qualification, Dis-qualifier, Push & Pull, Hoop Theory, Neg, Commonalities, AMOG, Conversational Rapport


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    2 comments

    Bastian March 29, 2011 - 3:04 am

    “The choices you make don’t shape your life as much as the choices other people make about you.”

    I strongly disagree! That would mean that other people shape my life which is completely untrue.

    Reply
    alphawolf March 29, 2011 - 6:24 pm

    @ Bastian, good point. I think the author of the book is trying to say, “sometimes our fate can be determined by others, and it is important to be aware of this and be aware that people who have power over you tend to make better decisions for you if you are likable vs. unlikable.”

    I am happy that we live in a free society (at least in the US)

    Reply

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